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sched·ule (skĕjl, --əl, skĕjəl)
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n.
1. A list of times of departures and arrivals; a timetable: a bus schedule; a schedule of guided tours.
2. A plan for performing work or achieving an objective, specifying the order and allotted time for each part: finished the project on schedule.
3. A printed or written list of items in tabular form: a schedule of postal rates.
4.
a. A program of events or appointments expected in a given time: Can you fit me into your schedule Tuesday afternoon?
b. A student's program of classes.
5. A supplemental statement of details appended to a document.
6.
a. A federally regulated list of controlled substances, ranked in classes by potential for abuse.
b. One of the ranks or classes in such a list.
tr.v. sched·uled, sched·ul·ing, sched·ules
1. To enter on a schedule: calculate and schedule each tax deduction on the proper form.
2. To make up a schedule for: I haven't scheduled the coming week yet.
3. To plan or appoint for a certain time or date: scheduled a trip in June; was scheduled to arrive Monday.
4. To list or rank (a controlled substance) in a schedule.

[Middle English sedule, slip of parchment or paper, note, from Old French cedule, from Late Latin schedula, diminutive of scheda, variant of Latin scida, papyrus strip, from Greek skhida, skhedē; perhaps akin to skhizein, to split; see SCHIZO-.]

schedu·lar adj.
schedu·ler n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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