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proc·ess 1 (prŏsĕs, prōsĕs)
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n. pl. proc·ess·es (prŏsĕsĭz, prōsĕs-, prŏsĭ-sēz, prōsĭ-)
1. A series of actions, changes, or functions bringing about a result: the process of digestion; the process of obtaining a driver's license.
2. A series of operations performed in the making or treatment of a product: a manufacturing process; leather dyed during the tanning process.
3. Progress; passage: the process of time; events now in process.
4. Law
a. The use of the law courts and other fora as a means of seeking redress: the adversarial process; due process of law.
b. The set of actions and events that constitute a legal proceeding or a significant portion thereof: the trial process; the sentencing process.
5. Law A means of compelling a person to appear in court, especially a summons ordering a defendant to appear in court.
6. Biology An outgrowth of tissue; a projecting part: a bony process.
7. Any of various photomechanical or photoengraving methods.
8. Computers
a. A running software program or other computing operation.
b. A part of a running software program or other computing operation that does a single task.
9. See conk3.
tr.v. proc·essed, proc·ess·ing, proc·ess·es
1. To put through the steps of a prescribed procedure: processing newly arrived immigrants; process an order.
2. To prepare, treat, or convert by subjecting to a special process: process ore to obtain minerals.
3. Computers To perform operations on (data).
4. To gain an understanding or acceptance of; come to terms with: processed the traumatic event in therapy.
5. To straighten (hair) by a chemical process; conk.
adj.
1. Prepared or converted by a special process: process cheese.
2. Made by or used in any of several photomechanical or photoengraving processes: a process print.

[Middle English proces, from Old French, development, from Latin prōcessus, from past participle of prōcēdere, to advance; see PROCEED.]

Usage Note: In recent decades there has been a tendency to pronounce the plural ending -es of processes as (-ēz), perhaps by analogy with words of Greek origin such as analysis and diagnosis. But process is not of Greek origin, and there is no etymological justification for this pronunciation of its plural. However, because this pronunciation is not uncommon even in educated speech, it is generally considered an acceptable variant, although it still strikes some listeners as a bungled affectation. · Although the pronunciation for process with a long (o), (prōsĕs), is more usual in British and Canadian English, it is an acceptable variant in American English.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
pro·cess 2 (prə-sĕs)
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intr.v. pro·cessed, pro·cess·ing, pro·cess·es
To move along in a procession: "The man in the panama hat offered his arm and ... they processed into the dining room" (Anita Brookner).

[Back-formation from PROCESSION.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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