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more (môr)
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adj. Comparative of many, much.
1.
a. Greater in number: a hall with more seats.
b. Greater in size, amount, extent, or degree: more land; more support.
2. Additional; extra: She needs some more time.
n.
A greater or additional quantity, number, degree, or amount: The more I see of you the more I like you.
pron.
(used with a pl. verb) A greater or additional number of persons or things: I opened only two bottles but more were in the refrigerator.
adv. Comparative of much.
1.
a. To or in a greater extent or degree: loved him even more.
b. Used to form the comparative of many adjectives and adverbs: more difficult; more softly. See Usage Note at perfect.
2. In addition: phoned twice more.
3. Moreover; furthermore.
Idioms:
more and more
To a steadily increasing extent or degree: getting more and more worried.
more or less
1. About; approximately: holds two tons, more or less.
2. To an undetermined degree: were more or less in agreement.

[Middle English, from Old English māra and māre; see mē-3 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

Usage Note: When a noun phrase contains more than one and a singular noun, the verb is normally singular: More than one editor is working on that project. More than one field has been planted with oats. When more than one is followed by of and a plural noun, the verb is plural: More than one of the paintings were stolen. More than one of the cottages are for sale. When more than one stands alone, it usually takes a singular verb, but it may take a plural verb if the notion of multiplicity predominates: The operating rooms are all in good order. More than one is (or are) equipped with the latest imaging technology. See Usage Notes at one, over.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
More (môr), Sir Thomas 1477?-1535.
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English politician, humanist scholar, and writer who refused to swear the Oath of Supremacy, which recognized Henry VIII's authority over that of the pope, and was beheaded for treason. His political essay Utopia (1516) speculates about life under an ideal government. More was canonized in 1935.
(click for a larger image)
Sir Thomas More
17th-century portrait by Peter Paul Rubens after a 1527 portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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