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meet 1 (mēt)
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v. met (mĕt), meet·ing, meets
v.tr.
1.
a. To come into the presence of by chance or arrangement: I was surprised to meet an old friend in the park. I met a friend for coffee.
b. To come into the company of: I met my colleagues for a meeting.
c. To be introduced to; make the acquaintance of: Have you met my wife?
d. To come together or confront in opposition: The rival teams meet next week.
2. To be present at the arrival of: met the train.
3. To come into conjunction with; join or touch: where the road meets the highway.
4. To come into conformity with the views, wishes, or opinions of: The firm has done its best to meet us on that point.
5. To come to the notice of (the senses): There is more here than meets the eye.
6. To experience or undergo: He met his fate with courage. The project has met a setback.
7.
a. To be sufficient for (a need, for example); fulfill: meet all the conditions in the contract. See Synonyms at satisfy.
b. To deal or contend with effectively: We can meet each problem as it arises.
c. To pay; settle: enough money to meet expenses.
v.intr.
1. To come together: Didn't recognize him when we met. Where should we meet for lunch?
2. To come into conjunction; be joined: The two pipes meet in the corner.
3. To come together as opponents; contend: The team met with its rival.
4. To become introduced: Where did the two of you meet?
5. To assemble: Protesters met in the square.
6. To occur together, especially in one person or entity: Suspense and intrigue meet in this new movie.
n.
A meeting or contest, especially an athletic competition.
Phrasal Verb:
meet with
1. To experience or undergo.
2. To receive: Our plan met with their approval.
Idioms:
meet cute
To make one another's acquaintance under unexpected and often comically adverse circumstances. Used especially of protagonists in a romantic comedy: In the movie, the lead characters meet cute in a park during a rainstorm.
meet (one's) Maker Slang
To die.
meet (someone) halfway
To make a compromise with.

[Middle English meten, from Old English mētan.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
meet 2 (mēt)
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adj.
Archaic
Fitting; proper: "It seems not meet, nor wholesome to my place" (Shakespeare).

[Middle English mete, from Old English gemǣte; see med- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

meetly adv.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

Indo-European & Semitic Roots Appendices

    Thousands of entries in the dictionary include etymologies that trace their origins back to reconstructed proto-languages. You can obtain more information about these forms in our online appendices:

    Indo-European Roots

    Semitic Roots

    The Indo-European appendix covers nearly half of the Indo-European roots that have left their mark on English words. A more complete treatment of Indo-European roots and the English words derived from them is available in our Dictionary of Indo-European Roots.

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