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lie 1 (lī)
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intr.v. lay (lā), lain (lān), ly·ing (līĭng), lies
1. To be or place oneself at rest in a flat, horizontal, or recumbent position; recline: He lay under a tree to sleep.
2. To be placed on or supported by a surface that is usually horizontal: Dirty dishes lay on the table. See Usage Note at lay1.
3. To be or remain in a specified condition: The dust has lain undisturbed for years. He lay sick in bed.
4.
a. To exist; reside: Our sympathies lie with the plaintiff.
b. To consist or have as a basis. Often used with in: The strength of his performance lies in his training.
5. To occupy a position or place: The lake lies beyond this hill.
6. To extend: Our land lies between these trees and the river.
7. To be buried in a specified place.
8. Law To be admissible or maintainable.
9. Archaic To stay for a night or short while.
n.
1. The manner or position in which something is situated.
2. A haunt or hiding place of an animal.
3. Sports The position of a golf ball that has come to a stop.
Phrasal Verbs:
lie down
To do little or nothing: He's lying down on the job.
lie in
To be in confinement for childbirth.
lie to Nautical
To remain stationary while facing the wind.
lie with
1. To be decided by, dependent on, or up to: The choice lies with you.
2. Archaic To have sexual intercourse with.
Idiom:
lie low
1. To keep oneself or one's plans hidden.
2. To bide one's time but remain ready for action.

[Middle English lien, from Old English licgan; see legh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
lie 2 (lī)
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n.
1. A false statement deliberately presented as being true; a falsehood.
2. Something meant to deceive or mistakenly accepted as true: learned his parents had been swindlers and felt his whole childhood had been a lie.
v. lied, ly·ing (līĭng), lies
v.intr.
1. To present false information with the intention of deceiving.
2. To convey a false image or impression: Appearances often lie.
v.tr.
To say or write as a lie.
Idiom:
lie through (one's) teeth
To lie outrageously or brazenly.

[Middle English, from Old English lyge; see leugh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

Synonyms: lie2, equivocate, fib, prevaricate
These verbs mean to evade or depart from the truth: a witness who lied under oath; didn't equivocate about her real purpose; fibbed to escape being scolded; didn't prevaricate but answered honestly.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
Lie (lē), Trygve Halvdan 1896-1968.
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Norwegian politician and first secretary-general of the United Nations (1946-1952).

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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