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im·age (ĭmĭj)
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n.
1.
a. A representation of the form of a person or object, such as a painting or photograph.
b. A sculptured likeness.
2. Physics An optically formed duplicate, counterpart, or other representative reproduction of an object, especially an optical reproduction formed by a lens or mirror.
3.
a. One that closely or exactly resembles another: He is the image of his uncle.
b. Likeness; semblance: Genesis says that man was made in the image of God.
4.
a. The opinion or concept of something that is held by the public: the public's image of business leaders as greedy.
b. The concept or character projected to the public, as by a person or institution, especially as interpreted by the mass media: an actor who tried to convey an image of refined beauty.
5. A typical example or embodiment: That child is the image of good health.
6. A mental picture of something not real or present: Our image of the cottage did not conform with reality.
7. A vivid description or representation in words, especially a metaphor or simile: The poem uses the image of a barren tree to convey feelings of desolation.
8. Mathematics A set of values of a function corresponding to a particular subset of a domain.
9. Computers An exact replica of the contents of a storage device, such as a hard disk, stored on a second storage device, such as a network server.
10. Obsolete An apparition.
tr.v. im·aged, im·ag·ing, im·ag·es
1.
a. To make or produce a likeness of: imaged the poet in bronze.
b. To mirror or reflect: a statue imaged in the water.
c. To make a visual representation of (an object) using remote scanning or technology such as magnetic resonance imaging: imaged the diseased kidneys; imaged the surface of Mars.
2. To symbolize or typify: a kneeling woman imaging the nation's grief.
3. To picture mentally; imagine or visualize: imaged each dive before doing it.
4. To describe, especially so vividly as to evoke a mental picture: The passage images what it's like to grow up poor.
5. Computers
a. To print (a file) using a laser printer, imagesetter, direct-to-plate press, or similar device.
b. To transmit (an exact replica of the contents of a storage device) to another storage device: imaged the hard drive to the server.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin imāgō; see aim- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

image·less adj.
imag·er n.
i·magi·nal (ĭ-măjə-nəl) adj.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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