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die 1 (dī)
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intr.v. died, dy·ing (dīĭng), dies
1. To stop living; become dead; expire: plants that died in the first frost of the season.
2. To cease existing, often gradually; fade: The sunlight died in the west.
3. To experience an intense, seemingly unbearable reaction to something: nearly died of embarrassment.
4. Informal To want something very much. Usually used in the progressive aspect: I am dying for a box of chocolates. She was dying to see the exhibit.
5. To stop working or operating: The motor died when we ran out of gas.
6. To become indifferent: had died to all worldly concerns.
Phrasal Verbs:
die back Botany
To be affected by dieback.
die down
To lose strength; subside: The winds died down.
die off
To undergo a sudden, sharp decline in population: hypothesized that pesticides were causing bees to die off across the country.
die out
To cease living or existing completely; become extinct: a theory that explains how the dinosaurs died out; customs that died out with the advent of technology.
Idioms:
die hard
1. To take a long time in passing out of existence: racial prejudices that die hard.
2. To resist against overwhelming, hopeless odds: radicalism that dies hard.
die on the vine
To fail, as from lack of support, especially at an early stage: a plan that died on the vine.
to die for Informal
Remarkable or highly desirable.

[Middle English dien, probably from Old Norse deyja; see dheu-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
die 2 (dī)
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n.
1. pl. dice(dīs)
a. A small cube marked on each side with from one to six dots, usually used in pairs in gambling and in various other games.
b. dice (used with a sing. verb) A game of chance using dice.
2. pl. dies A device used for cutting out, forming, or stamping material, especially:
a. An engraved metal piece used for impressing a design onto a softer metal, as in coining money.
b. One of several component pieces that are fitted into a diestock to cut threads on screws or bolts.
c. A part on a machine that punches shaped holes in, cuts, or forms sheet metal, cardboard, or other stock.
d. A metal block containing small conical holes through which plastic, metal, or other ductile material is extruded or drawn.
3. pl. dies Architecture The dado of a pedestal, especially when cube-shaped.
tr.v. died, die·ing, dies
To cut, form, or stamp with or as if with a die.
Idioms:
load the dice
1. To make an outcome highly probable; predetermine a result: “These factors merely load the dice, upping the odds that a household will fall into a certain ... income distribution” (Thomas G. Exter).
2. To put another at a distinct disadvantage, as through prior maneuver: The dice were loaded against the defendant before the trial.
no dice
1. Of no use; futile.
2. Used as a refusal to a request.
the die is cast
The decision has been made and is irrevocable.

[Middle English de, gaming die, from Old French, possibly from Latin datum, given (as by fortune in the roll of the dice), neuter of datus, past participle of dare, to give; see dō- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
(click for a larger image)
die2
dies used to coin the euro

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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