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bound 1 (bound)
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intr.v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
1. To leap forward or upward; jump; spring: The dog bounded over the gate.
2. To move forward by leaps or springs: The deer bounded into the woods.
3. To spring back from a surface; rebound: The basketball bounded off the backboard.
n.
1. A leap; a jump: The deer was away in a single bound.
2. A springing back from a surface after hitting it; a bounce: caught the ball on the bound.

[French bondir, to bounce, from Old French, to resound, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bombitīre, from Latin bombitāre, to hum, from bombus, a humming sound, from Greek bombos.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
bound 2 (bound)
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n.
1. often bounds A boundary; a limit: Our joy knew no bounds. Your remarks exceed the bounds of reason.
2. bounds The territory on, within, or near limiting lines: the bounds of the kingdom.
v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
v.tr.
1. To set a limit to; confine: a high wall that bounded the prison yard; lives that were bounded by poverty.
2. To constitute the boundary or limit of: a city park that was bounded by busy streets.
3. To identify the boundaries of; demarcate.
v.intr.
To border on another place, state, or country.
Idioms:
in/within boundsSports
Within the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore in play or legal.
out of bounds
1. Sports Outside the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore not in play or legal.
2. Outside the boundary of where one is allowed to be; in a forbidden or unauthorized place: The research lab is out of bounds for first-year students.
3. In violation of acceptable rules or standards, as of decency: felt the guest's behavior was out of bounds.

[Middle English, from Old French bodne, bonde and Anglo-Norman bunde, both from Medieval Latin bodina, of Celtic origin.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
bound 3 (bound)
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v.
Past tense and past participle of bind.
adj.
1. Confined by bonds; tied: bound hostages.
2. Being under legal or moral obligation: bound by my promise.
3. Equipped with a cover or binding: bound volumes.
4. Predetermined; certain: We're bound to be late.
5. Determined; resolved: Many public policy students are bound to be politicians one day.
6. Linguistics Being a form, especially a morpheme, that cannot stand as an independent word, such as a prefix or suffix.
7. Constipated.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
bound 4 (bound)
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adj.
Headed or intending to head in a specified direction: commuters bound for home; a south-bound train.

[Alteration of Middle English boun, ready, from Old Norse būinn, past participle of būa, to get ready; see bheuə- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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