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Rome 1 (rōm)
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1. The capital and largest city of Italy, in the west-central part of the country on the Tiber River. Traditionally founded by Romulus in 753 BC, it was ruled first by Etruscans, who were overthrown c. 500 BC. The Roman Republic gradually extended its territory and expanded its influence, giving way to the Roman Empire during the reign of Augustus (27 BC-AD 14). As capital of the empire, Rome was considered the center of the known world, but the city declined when Constantine transferred his capital to Byzantium (c. 330). Alaric I conquered the city in 410, leading to a lengthy period of devastation by Germanic tribes. In the Middle Ages the city revived as the spiritual and temporal power of the papacy increased. During the 1800s Rome was held at various times by the French until it became the capital of Italy in 1871. Vatican City remains an independent enclave within the confines of Rome.
2. A city of central New York on the Mohawk River west-northwest of Utica. Because of its location as a portage point, the city was strategically important during the French and Indian Wars and the American Revolution.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2020 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
Rome 2 (rōm)
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n.
A variety of apple having round firm fruit with tough red skin.

[After Rome Township, Ohio, where it was discovered.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2020 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

Indo-European & Semitic Roots Appendices

    Thousands of entries in the dictionary include etymologies that trace their origins back to reconstructed proto-languages. You can obtain more information about these forms in our online appendices:

    Indo-European Roots

    Semitic Roots

    The Indo-European appendix covers nearly half of the Indo-European roots that have left their mark on English words. A more complete treatment of Indo-European roots and the English words derived from them is available in our Dictionary of Indo-European Roots.

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