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rush 1 (rŭsh)
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v. rushed, rush·ing, rush·es
v.intr.
1. To move swiftly; hurry: rushed after the bus.
2. To act with great haste: rushed to finish the project.
3. To make a sudden or swift attack or charge: The cavalry rushed down upon the encampment.
4. To flow or surge rapidly, often with noise: Water rushed over the cliff.
5. Football To advance the ball or attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it rather than passing.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move rapidly: had to rush fresh troops to the front lines.
2. To cause to act with haste: made a mistake because we were rushed.
3. To perform with great haste: had to rush the project to complete it on time.
4. To attack swiftly and suddenly: Infantry rushed the enemy after the artillery barrage.
5. To transport or carry hastily: An ambulance rushed her to the hospital.
6. To entertain or pay great attention to: They rushed him for their fraternity.
7. Football To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
n.
1. A sudden movement toward something: a rush to leave the room.
2.
a. An anxious and eager movement to get to or from a place: a rush to the goldfields.
b. A sudden widespread demand: a rush for gold coins.
3. General haste or busyness: The office always operates in a rush.
4. A sudden attack; an onslaught.
5. A rapid, often noisy flow or passage: listened to the rush of the wind.
6. A large or overwhelming number or amount: a rush of last-minute holiday orders.
7. Football
a. An attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it.
b. An act of running at a passer or kicker in order to block or prevent a play.
8. Sports A rapid advance of the puck toward the opponent's goal in ice hockey.
9. rushes The first, unedited print of a movie scene.
10. A drive by a Greek society on a college campus to recruit new members: a sorority rush.
11.
a. A surge or release of emotion: felt a rush of fear. See Synonyms at flow.
b. A sudden, brief exhilaration: felt a heady rush when her name was called out as the winner.
c. The intensely pleasurable sensation experienced immediately after use of a stimulant or a mind-altering drug.
adj.
Performed with or requiring great haste or urgency: a rush job; a rush order.

[Middle English rushen, from Anglo-Norman russher, variant of Old French ruser, to drive back, from Latin recūsāre, to reject : re-, re- + causārī, to give as a reason (from causa, cause).]

rusher n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
rush 2 (rŭsh)
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n.
1.
a. Any of various grasslike wetland plants of the genus Juncus, having stiff hollow or pithy stems and small usually clustered brownish flowers.
b. Any of various similar plants, such as a bulrush.
2. The stem of one of these plants, used in making baskets, mats, and chair seats.

[Middle English, from Old English rysc.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
Rush (rŭsh), Benjamin 1745-1813.
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American physician, politician, and educator. A signer of the Declaration of Independence, he promoted the abolition of slavery and the humane treatment of people with mental illness.
(click for a larger image)
Benjamin Rush
c. 1813 portrait by
Thomas Sully

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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