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rose 1 (rōz)
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n.
1. A member of the rose family.
2.
a. Any of numerous shrubs or vines of the genus Rosa, having prickly stems and pinnately compound leaves, widely cultivated for their showy, often fragrant flowers.
b. The flower of any of these plants.
c. Any of various other plants, especially one having similar flowers.
3. A dark pink to moderate red.
4. An ornament, such as a decorative knot, resembling a rose in form; a rosette.
5. A perforated nozzle for spraying water from a hose or sprinkling can.
6.
a. A form of gem cut marked by a flat base and a faceted, hemispheric upper surface.
b. A gem, especially a diamond, cut in this manner.
7. A rose window.
8. A compass card or its representation, as on a map.
9. roses That which is marked by favor, success, or ease of execution: Directing this play has been all roses since the new producer took over.
adj.
1. Of the color rose.
2. Relating to, containing, or used for roses.
3. Scented or flavored with or as if with roses.
Idioms:
come up roses
To result favorably or successfully: Those were difficult times but now everything's coming up roses.
under the rose
Sub rosa.

[Middle English, from Old English, from Latin rosa.]

Word History: It is etymologically correct to drink a julep while watching the Run for the Roses. The English word rose comes from Latin and Old French. Latin rosa may be an Etruscan form of Greek Rhodia, "Rhodian, originating from Rhodes." The Attic Greek word for rose is rhodon, and in Sappho's Aeolic dialect of Greek it is wrodon. In Avestan, the language of the Persian prophet Zoroaster, "rose" is varəda and in Armenian vard, words both related to the Aeolic form. The Modern Persian word for "rose" is gul (which, believe it or not, is descended from a form quite similar to varəda through a series of regular sound changes); and gul-āb is "rose-water." Gulāb is also a drink made of water and honey or syrup. The name of this Persian treat was borrowed into Arabic as julāb and then, through Spanish and French, became julep in English, the ambrosia for sipping on Derby Day.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
rose 2 (rōz)
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v.
Past tense of rise.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
ro·sé (rō-zā)
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n.
A light pink wine made from purple grapes, with the skins being removed from the juice during fermentation as soon as the desired color has been attained.

[French (vin) rosé, pink (wine), from Old French, from rose, rose; see ROSE1.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
Rose (rōz), Peter Edward Known as "Pete." Born 1941.
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American baseball player who played with the Cincinnati Reds from 1963 to 1978 and returned as the team's manager in 1984. During his playing career he set 24 major-league records, including hits (4,256). He was banned from the sport in 1989 for betting on baseball games.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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