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HOW TO USE THE DICTIONARY

To look up an entry in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, use the search window above. For best results, after typing in the word, click on the “Search” button instead of using the “enter” key.

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THE USAGE PANEL

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The Panelists

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100 Words
100 More Words Every High School Graduate Should Know

Ideal for juniors and seniors in high school as well as adults who want to see how their vocabulary skills stack up, 100 More Words Every High School Graduate Should Know is the latest book in the popular 100 Words series from the American Heritage Dictionaries and a sequel to the original title in the series (published in 2002). This book includes one hundred words of varying degrees of difficulty, representing the kinds of words high school students encounter in their classes and on standardized tests. From alacrity to zygote, with stops along the way at eponymous and lambent, the words are invariably intriguing and useful. Each entry includes the definition, pronunciation, and etymology, and often one or more quotations from classical and contemporary authors showing how the word is used in context.


Here is a complete list of the words in 100 More Words Every High School Graduate Should Know


alacrity
amorphous
anathema
anomie
antithesis
apotheosis
arcanum
bathos
bellwether
bespeak
caldera
coalesce
compunction
conflate
crepuscular
cynosure
debunk
derivative
diaphanous
duress
efface
effulgent
eponymous
eureka
excoriate
fastidious
feint
feral
gaffe
galvanize
gravitas
habiliments
heterodox
hydrocarbon
impugn
inchoate
indigenous
innate
intransigent
juggernaut
kelvin
lacuna
lambent
lineament
Luddite
mellifluous
miasma
munificent
nascence
neophyte
nexus
noisome
nominal
obliquity
ontogeny
opprobrium
ossify
oviparous
palpable
panoply
penurious
permutation
perpetuity
perquisite
phalanx
placebo
proximate
querulous
quorum
rapacious
refractory
repudiate
risible
salient
sanctimonious
sardonic
scurrilous
sequester
Sisyphean
solicitous
subsume
tenacious
travesty
triage
truculent
umbrage
unregenerate
untenable
usury
verisimilitude
vernacular
vertiginous
vociferous
welter
wiki
winsome
xeric
yaw
zero-sum
zygote


Indo-European & Semitic Roots Appendices

    Thousands of entries in the dictionary include etymologies that trace their origins back to reconstructed proto-languages. You can obtain more information about these forms in our online appendices:

    Indo-European Roots

    Semitic Roots

    The Indo-European appendix covers nearly half of the Indo-European roots that have left their mark on English words. A more complete treatment of Indo-European roots and the English words derived from them is available in our Dictionary of Indo-European Roots.

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